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What Does “Power of Attorney” Mean?

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What Does “Power of Attorney” Mean?
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A power of attorney is a legal document that gives a person the authority to act on another's behalf.

A power of attorney is a legal document giving one person—the “agent”—the legal power to make legal, financial, or medical decisions for another person. According to a recent article from Nerd Wallet, “What is a Power of Attorney (POA)? Types, How, When to Use,” the POA lets someone act on your behalf if you are traveling, too sick to act on your own behalf or can’t be present to sign legal documents.

You may name any adult, including your spouse, adult child, sibling, or a trusted friend, to act as your agent under power of attorney. It can be granted to anyone who is a legal adult and of sound mind. Ordinary power of attorney designations dissolve if you become incapacitated. However, durable power of attorney designations remain intact, even upon incapacity.

You can give one person power of attorney or divide the responsibilities among multiple people.

Most people don’t know that power of authority authorizations can be very specific or general, depending on your needs. When having an experienced estate planning attorney draft a power of attorney, review the desired scope of your agent’s authority, when it should take effect and the desired duration.

If you don’t have a POA and become incapacitated, a court can appoint someone to act on your behalf. However, court intervention turns a private matter into a public proceeding, and you cannot know if the appointed conservator will follow your wishes.

There are several types of POA’s. The durable power of attorney remains intact, even when you are incapacitated. The ordinary POA becomes moot once you are incapacitated. A dual POA gives power to two people and requires both individuals to sign off on any decisions.

A dual power of attorney may be useful if you have two children, for instance, and you’d like them to make joint decisions for you. Regardless of how many powers of attorney you appoint, you should always name successor agents for each power of attorney, in case the primary person is unable or unwilling to serve when needed.

A medical power of attorney, also called a health care proxy, is a type of advance directive giving another person to make all health care decisions for you in accordance with your wishes when you are unable to do so. Health care proxy decisions generally cover any type of medical treatment or procedure to diagnose and treat your health. Make sure the person you grant medical power of attorney to is familiar with your wishes and knows what decisions you would want in treatment or for life—supporting measures.

To learn more about estate planning in the East Valley, Gilbert, Mesa and Queen Creek, schedule your free consultation with Attorney Jake Carlson by using one of the links above.

Reference: Nerd Wallet (May 10, 2023) “What is a Power of Attorney (POA)? Types, How, When to Use”

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